Proof That Elephants Never Forget!

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You know that saying: An elephant never forgets? Well, it turns out that it’s true if this heart-warming, real-life story is anything to go by.

Elephants are the largest terrestrial animals on the face of the earth, but their continued existence is sadly threatened by poaching. Highly intelligent, sensitive beings, elephants, are often the victims of cruel treatment by humans.

Some, luckily, get rescued. Yatta, an 18-year-old female elephant, is one of them.

A sad beginning

Yatta, like so many others of her kind, was a victim of poachers who murdered her mother for her tusks. That left Yatta an orphan at just one-month-old.

Luckily for her, some men who were working nearby in the Tsavo? Athi triangle of Tsavo East National Park heard her anguished cries for help.

They rushed to her aid and helped to transfer her to the world-renowned David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust (DSWT). The Trust rescues and rehabilitates elephants that have been orphaned.

In its time, the Trust has helped to return more than 100 elephants to the wild.

Ill health

Although the trust gave her somewhere safe to live, Yatta struggled with several serious health problems. These included stiff joints, weakness, and even collapse.

But as she grew up, she started getting better due to the excellent treatment she received at the center.

When a ten years old, the strong elephant got ready for independent living, she was released into the wild. Little did the facility know that Yatta had a surprise in store for them.

It was not the last time they would see this elephant, and next time, she’d be accompanied by a little surprise … or two.

Welcome back

Sometime after Yatta’s release, she returned to the sanctuary with someone special. With her was her newborn calf, male and the sanctuary named Yoyo.

The little elephant baby stayed close to his mother, but couldn’t resist showing how excited he was to meet his human family.

Waving his trunk around the employees of the facility, Yoyo flapped his ears in joy. But Yoyo wasn’t the only one Yatta had brought with her.

Alongside her mother was Yatta’s firstborn, a female the facility staff dubbed Yetu. Mum’s first baby kept a watchful eye on her baby brother.

A happy homecoming

Amazingly, it’s not uncommon for rescued elephants to return to their rescuers. Every time it happens, it’s a happy occasion for everyone.

When Yatta brought her babies to meet her human family for the first time, she showed her absolute Trust in her former caregivers.

What an honor it was for these dedicated volunteers and employees to meet the elephant they rescued so long ago and her two offspring.

They knew they had saved not only one elephant, but a whole line of elephants that could go on to repopulate the land. The fact is, the family is of utmost importance to elephants.

Yatta sees her humans as a family and had to share her new arrival with them.

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